Cardioid Strikes A Defiant Chord On Single “Cool For The Day”; Second Single Off ‘Crystal Lattice Lullabies’ Out Now

*The Following Press Release Was Issued By fiftyCC*

CARDIOID STRIKES A DEFIANT CHORD ON SINGLE “COOL FOR THE DAY”; 

SECOND SINGLE OFF CRYSTAL LATTICE LULLABIES OUT NOW 

PORTLAND, OR — Cardioid unleashed “Cool for the Day,” an anthemic new single from her upcoming Crystal Lattice Lullabies, the anticipated follow-up to last fall’s acclaimed Fantasy Metal EP. 

A stomping, tempestuous mix of squalling guitars, pleading vocals and driving percussion, “Cool for the Day” is another knock-out by the Portland-based synth-pop musician, also known as Lizzy Ellison (and formerly of Radiation City). It’s now available on all major streaming platforms. 

LISTEN ON BANDCAMP: https://cardioidmusic.bandcamp.com/track/cool-for-the-day 

Following the more wistful and nostalgic tone of lead single “Party Time,” “Cool for the Day” dials up the sonic turmoil and dreamy production while nurturing Ellison’s self-assured vocals in a chrysalis of sound and fury, until her voice rings out more powerfully and definitively than ever. 

“This is a sarcastic song about someone who thinks that their ‘coolness’ will ultimately be what makes them happy,” explains Ellison. “I joke in the chorus singing, ‘Everytime, you close your eyes, I will think of you and all your glory, ah…./And it’s enough to make you cry.’ This person is too cool for school, assuming when they stop paying attention to me, it will make me want them more, because they are just so incredible.” Adds Ellison, after a beat: “And that’s just completely ridiculous.”  

Discussing “Cool for the Day” from a production perspective, Ellison cites the Velvet Underground as one influence on its steady, relentless rhythm. “It’s a catchy tune for women to chant towards those that have snubbed them,” she says. “I have since grown out of this pettiness, but, alas, I love this song.”

“Cool for the Day” arrived just one week before the Feb. 5 release of Cardoid’s anticipated Crystal Lattice Lullabies, a conceptual prequel to Fantasy Metal that takes a more intimate and stripped-down approach to charting Ellison’s journey toward self-discovery. Comprising seven immaculately formed tracks written and recorded over a five-year period, the release also includes “Party Time,” live staple “Tulum,” and never-before-heard tracks like the exquisitely slow-blooming “Sake” and cathartic “The Beginning.”

The creative project of Portland-based frontwoman Lizzy Ellison (previously of Portland’s Radiation City), Cardioid flits between genres and tones with the sly, dexterous abandon of a woman in full control. Evoking the distorted guitar ballads of Angel Olsen one minute and the funky, mercurial art-rock of St. Vincent the next, her music is unstuck in time and edged with mist. 

Crystal Lattice Lullabies will be available digitally Feb. 5 on Bandcamp, Spotify, Apple Music and other major platforms.

Crystal Lattice Lullabies Track Listing:

  1. Cool for the Day
  2. Lucy
  3. The Beginning
  4. Tulum
  5. Sake
  6. Party Time
  7. Arrows

Crystal Lattice Lullabies was recorded by Elisabeth Ellison (guitar, vocals, bass) with Riley Geare (drums) and mixed and mastered by Geo Botelho.

About Cardioid

The main creative project of Lizzy Ellison (previously of Portland’s Radiation City), Cardioid flits between genres and tones with the sly, dexterous abandon of an artist in full control. Evoking the distorted guitar ballads of Angel Olsen one minute and the funky, mercurial art-rock of St. Vincent the next, her music is tactile, industrial-strength dream-pop awash in fuzzed-out guitars and retrowave synths. Ellison terms it “fantasy metal,” silvery and elusive, resoundingly strong yet invitingly fluid. Cardioid’s first full-length, 2017’s “Parts Dept.,” was a nine-track exploration of loss and longing Ellison now looks back on like an old diary. Her new and upcoming music is something else – coiled, wry, rhapsodic, sensual. “I’d love to someday make a record that’s not autobiographical,” maintains Ellison. “But I just can’t.” The music, instead, serves as a mirror to the restless, virtuosic mind of a woman only now reaching the peak of her sonic powers. Visit cardioidmusic.com and follow Cardioid on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

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